Wait Until Dark – Review

by juliusmsanz

Audrey Hepburn didn’t get into many different genres (to be honest she acted in quite a few), which I felt was a shame as I wanted to see how she would fare, but she played her role very well in this one. She has to be one of my favorite actresses and icons.

Wait_Until_Dark_1967

This mix of suspense and thriller came out in 1967 directed by Terence Young, the same guy who directed Dr. No and From Russia with Love, two of my favorites in the Bond series.

Now this film starts out nicely enough, but it is only when Alan Arkin shows up that the real fun begins. It’s a game of tricks, of trying to find a doll stuffed with heroin. With the husband gone, Audrey Hepburn, blind, is left to try to make sense of what is going on and why the bad guys want the doll. I think that the fact that this movie is all about tricks and playing a waiting game, is what makes everything so exciting. That and the fact that the film has a very small cast. I like small casts in films because they allow the characters to be more developed. The bad guys don’t just play games on Audrey, they even play games amongst themselves and end up suffering the consequences. This movie, believe it or not, has also one of the best jump scares that I have ever seen, and that is saying a lot.

What I also feel to be noteworthy is how they make a blind woman the protagonist. Now remember that this is 1967, women weren’t seen in the same light as they are now, so this woman is set to have a double disadvantage: she cannot see, but can be hurt by three different men. And she makes it out of the whole ordeal alive and relatively safe, barring certain emotional scars. I have family members who are blind, and I know some of the hardships they go through, so to see this represented and to see her character portrayed as independent and self-reliant made my day.

Is this the best movie in the world, the best of all-time? No, but it does a good job and I really enjoyed it, that’s why I saw it a second time.

Have a nice day!

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